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Thursday, June 22

  1. page Reference Works and Abbreviations edited ... SChr Sources chrétiennes (Paris, 1940– ) SEHI James F. Kenney, Sources for the Early History …
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    SChr Sources chrétiennes (Paris, 1940– )
    SEHI James F. Kenney, Sources for the Early History of Ireland. Volume I: Ecclesiastical (1929; reprinted with addenda by Ludwig Bieler, New York, 1966) [cited by no.]
    SLE José Carlos Martín, with Carmen Cardelle de Hartmann and Jacques Elfassi, Sources latines de l'Espagne tardo-antique et médiévale (Ve-XIVe siècles). Répertoire bibliographique, Documents, études et répertoires publiés par l'Institut de Recherche et d'Histoire des Textes 77 (Paris, 2010)
    SS The Publications of the Surtees Society (London, 1835– )
    TRE Theologische Realenzyklopädie, ed. Horst Robert Balz, Gerhard Krause, and Gerhard Müller (Berlin and New York, 1976– )
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  2. page Reference Works and Abbreviations edited ... AOT H. F. D. Sparks, The Apocryphal Old Testament (Oxford, 1984) AS Acta Sanctorum, ed. Socii…
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    AOT H. F. D. Sparks, The Apocryphal Old Testament (Oxford, 1984)
    AS Acta Sanctorum, ed. Socii Bollandiani, 1st ed., 71 vols (Antwerp and Brussels, 1643– 1940); reprinted in 65 vols (Brussels, 1965–70)
    ...
    (Oxford, 2006) [In the case of reprinted booklists, see ML]
    ASM Helmut Gneuss and Michael Lapidge, Anglo-Saxon Manuscripts: A Bibliographical Handlist of Manuscripts and Manuscript Fragments Written or Owned in England up to 1100, Toronto Anglo-Saxon Series 15 (Toronto, 2014) [cited by no.]
    ASMMF Anglo-Saxon Manuscripts in Microfiche Facsimile, ed. A. N. Doane, Matthew Hussey, and Phillip Pulsiano, 12 vols to date (Tempe, AZ, 1994– )
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    SRL Scriptores Rerum Langobardicarum et Italicarum
    SRM Scriptores Rerum Merovingicarum
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    pp 33–89 [Checked against the revised versions in ASL, but noted only when different]
    NCE New Catholic Encyclopedia, ed. Thomas Carson, Joann Cerrito, et al., 2nd ed., 15 vols (Detroit, Mich., and Washington, D.C., 2003)
    NRK N. R. Ker, Catalogue of Manuscripts Containing Anglo-Saxon (1957; reprinted with a supplement, Oxford, 1990)
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  3. page space.menu edited ... SASLC on Twitter Publications List of Reference Works and Abbreviations Guide for Reader…
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    SASLC on Twitter
    Publications
    List ofReference Works and Abbreviations
    Guide for Readers
    Published Entries
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    Editorial Board Access
    Classic Source Studies of Anglo-Saxon Literature
    Coming Soon
    Papers and Articles

    Coming Soon
    SASLC on ScholarWorks
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  4. page Using this Wiki edited ... If you are a contributing member of the SASLC project, create a Wikispaces account to access t…
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    If you are a contributing member of the SASLC project, create a Wikispaces account to access this site, and your wiki membership request will be sent to the moderator. When you create an account, please use your first and last name, a brief bio indicating who you are in your profile, and a contact email address; failure to do so will result in rejection of your membership request.
    If you are interested in becoming a contributing member of the SASLC project, please contact a member of the Editorial Board.
    Publications Pages
    These pages represent the published work of SASLC. Among them are the standard list of Reference Works and Abbreviations and a Guide for Readers (by Frederick M. Biggs) that are appended to each published volume.

    The Published Entries page (public) is a repository for completed, peer-reviewed entries available to the public. It includes two types of publications:1) Print fascicles, comprised of entries collected together thematically; as well as reference works previously published for the project. Content for all print fascicles (published by Amsterdam University Press) will remain under an embargo for a certain length of time while they remain in print and available for purchase. After a print run embargo has been lifted, the content will be made available to the public open access.2) A list of all other entries published directly online, alphabetized by author and then works, with links to individual pages including entries' contents. This list will expand as the project continues.
    The Entries Under Review page (members-only) is a repository for contributors' submissions that need to be peer-reviewed, edited, and made ready for publication (on the wiki or in print). As entries are submitted to the Editors, they will be uploaded to this page, which will act as a clearing house for content ready to edit but not ready for publication. Members have access to this page so that they may help in the reviewing process--reading entries and offering suggestions for changes before entries have been fully edited and published. Once entries have been reviewed and edited, they will be removed from the review stage and added to the Published Entries page.
    Pages about Fascicles in Progress and Projected Entries & Fascicles are spaces for providing information about what is in progress at any given moment.
    For Contributors
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    an entry; a sample "Guide for Readers" (by Frederick M. Biggs); a list of commonly used abbreviations used for the project and Michael Lapidge's Abbreviations for Sources and Specifications of Standard Editions for Sources {Lapidge, Michael-Abbreviations for Sources and Specification of Standard Editions for Sources.pdf} (Binghamton, 1988); as well as a page for planning and discussing future fascicles.administrative records like the minutes of each annual meeting. The last page (FasciclesFascicles Planning & Discussion)Discussion page is a
    Site License and Disclaimers
    This wiki is meant as a public page for the SASLC project to share the fruits of its labors. All public content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0) license, and anyone is able to access and use the public content under those terms. However, content available to members only is sensitive content, for the use of the project team only. Be aware that these are often draft, pre-print, and not publicly available forms of scholarship; they should not be cited or disseminated without the express permission of individual contributors. If you have any questions about the wiki, feel free to email Brandon W. Hawk.
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  5. page Guide for Contributing (deleted) edited
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  6. page space.menu edited ... Projected Entries & Fascicles For Contributors Guide to Writing an Entry for Contribut…
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    Projected Entries & Fascicles
    For Contributors
    Guide to Writing an Entryfor Contributors
    Fascicles Planning & Discussion
    Administrative Records
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  7. page Guide for Contributors edited ... Check for your author or work in the index of ML. If it’s there, cite the list(s) by short tit…
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    Check for your author or work in the index of ML. If it’s there, cite the list(s) by short title as given in the “Guide for Readers,” with reference to the item number(s) in ML.
    3. A-S Vers
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    your text, checkingcheck the indexes
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    and to GRStanley Greenfield and Fred Robinson, A Bibliography of Publications on Old English Literature to the End of 1972 (Toronto, 1980), as well
    If there is an A-S version, then get the standard edition, which should be listed in the List of Texts, but keep in mind that the edition cited by DOE may have been superseded. Check relevant secondary lit for the information you’ll need to discuss in the body of the entry (such as date and authorship, how much of the text is translated, which parts, etc.).
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    headnote, consult GR,the Greenfield-Robinson Bibliography, supplemented by
    4-5. Quots/Cits and Refs
    (These two categories can be dealt with together.)
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    Once you’ve located the quots/cits and refs, list them in the headnote in chronological order, employing the AC abbreviations for the OE works, with page and line references to the standard editions, according to the format specified in the “Guide to Readers.”
    Body of the entry
    ...
    Since the Gneuss/LapidgeGneuss-Lapidge bibliography in
    For bibliography on your Latin work, in addition to CPL and the other reference works listed above, consult especially Medioevo Latino: Bollettino bibliografico della cultura europea dal secolo VI al XIII (Spoleto, 1979– ), preferably via the online Mirabile database. Note that in the print volumes, bibliography on the influence of pre-medieval authors in the Middle Ages is gathered under the heading “Fortleben.” As a rule, you should only cite bibliography that’s immediately relevant to whatever problems you need to discuss in the body of the entry. It is not SASLC’s purpose to compile complete bibliographies on every Latin author or work. Completeness is desired only for secondary literature directly pertaining to knowledge of the work in Anglo-Saxon England.
    The remainder of the body of the entry is devoted to brief discussion and explanation of the information summarized in the other categories of the headnote, noting for example in the case of a quot/cit what idea, theme, or motif is taken from the Latin work. If it’s uncertain whether the Anglo-Saxon author knew the work first–hand or through an intermediate source, or if a quot/cit or ref is doubtful, this should be explained here. The entry may conclude with any relevant comments or suggestions about work in progress or desiderata.
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  8. page Reference Works and Abbreviations edited ... AOT H. F. D. Sparks, The Apocryphal Old Testament (Oxford, 1984) AS Acta Sanctorum, ed. Socii…
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    AOT H. F. D. Sparks, The Apocryphal Old Testament (Oxford, 1984)
    AS Acta Sanctorum, ed. Socii Bollandiani, 1st ed., 71 vols (Antwerp and Brussels, 1643– 1940); reprinted in 65 vols (Brussels, 1965–70)
    ASL Michael Lapidge, The Anglo-Saxon Library (Oxford, 2006)
    ASM Helmut Gneuss and Michael Lapidge, Anglo-Saxon Manuscripts: A Bibliographical Handlist of Manuscripts and Manuscript Fragments Written or Owned in England up to 1100, Toronto Anglo-Saxon Series 15 (Toronto, 2014) [cited by no.]
    ASMMF Anglo-Saxon Manuscripts in Microfiche Facsimile, ed. A. N. Doane, Matthew Hussey, and Phillip Pulsiano, 12 vols to date (Tempe, AZ, 1994– )
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  9. page Guide for Contributors edited This checklist is meant to alert SASLC contributors to several tools that are indispensable for res…
    This checklist is meant to alert SASLC contributors to several tools that are indispensable for research into the sources of Anglo-Saxon literary culture, and to supplement the instructions provided by the Guide for Readers in the SASLC Wiki, which you should consult first for information on organizing your entry.
    BeginThis checklist is meant to alert SASLC contributors to several tools that are indispensable for research into the sources of Anglo-Saxon literary culture, and to supplement the instructions provided by the Guide for Readers in the SASLC Wiki, which you should consult first for information on organizing your entry. Also consult the Reference Works and Abbreviations (references works mentioned in this Guide will be cited by the abbreviations expanded there).
    Begin
    by fashioning
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    CPL, and RGA where relevant.RGA. References to
    ...
    in the Guide for ReadersReference Works and Abbreviations as relevant
    For further relevant reference works see the online Bibliographies by Charles D. Wright:
    The Bible and Its Interpretation
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    Medieval History and Historical Sources
    Medieval Christianity and Ecclesiastical Sources
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    five different categories. Herecategories:
    1. MSS
    2. Lists
    3. A-S Vers
    4. Quots/Cits
    5. Refs
    Here
    are some
    For starters, check to see what Ogilvy says in BKE, and try to verify his claims. Don’t forget to check Ogilvy’s “Books Known to the English, A. D. 597-1066: Addenda et Corrigenda,” Mediaevalia 7 (1984), 281-325, and also check for supplementary information in the reviews of Ogilvy by Wallach, Gneuss, and Bloomfield.
    MSS1. MSS
    List Latin manuscripts of the work either written or owned in Anglo-Saxon England (by city, library, and shelf-mark, followed by the manuscript’s number in ASM). ASM is extremely thorough, but note that some Latin texts are silently subsumed under generic headings as “Computisica” or “Sermons,” so the absence of an entry for the work in the index does not necessarily mean that it occurs in no Anglo-Saxon manuscript. If you are dealing with a work that is not itemized in ASM, first consult any editions or other secondary sources that give a list of manuscripts containing the work. Then consult available published or online library catalogues of the manuscript(s) in which you think a text might be subsumed under a particular generic heading. To locate the appropriate manuscript catalogue(s), check Paul O. Kristeller and Sigrid Kramer, //Latin Manuscript Books Before 1600//, revised digital edition 2016. For manuscripts in British libraries, see Neil R. Ker, Medieval Manuscripts in British Libraries (Oxford, 1969–83), in three volumes: Vol. 1 = London; Vol. 2 = Abbotsford–Keele; Vol. 3 = Lampeter–Oxford. (Ker died before completing vol. 4, so there’s no place to go other than Kristeller for libraries in British cities that begin with a letter after O). Ker also has a Medieval Libraries of Great Britain: A List of Surviving Books, 2nd ed. (London, 1964). A Supplement to the Second Edition of Ker’s Medieval Libraries has been edited by Andrew G. Watson, Royal Historical Society Guides and Handbooks 15 (London, 1987). For Norman manuscripts between the Conquest and 1100 check Richard Gameson, The Manuscripts of Early Norman England (c. 1066–1130) (Oxford, 1999)
    If the work in question has ever been falsely attributed to Augustine or Jerome, it will probably be included among the lists of manuscripts in Manfred Oberleitner et al., Die handschriftliche Überlieferung der Werke des Heiligen Augustinus (Vienna, 1969- ), also in the Vienna Sitzungsberichte; or in Lambert’s BHM. The information they contain may have been partly superseded anyway by John Machielsen’s Clavis Patristica Pseudepigraphorum Medii Aevi (Turnhout, 1990-).
    ...
    Manuscript Research: Identifying Texts and Locating Secondary Literature
    Medieval and Modern Manuscript Catalogue and Digitized Manuscripts
    Lists2. Lists
    Check for your author or work in the index of ML. If it’s there, cite the list(s) by short title as given in the “Guide for Readers,” with reference to the item number(s) in ML.
    A-S3. A-S Vers
    Here,
    ...
    number [= DOELT] according to the List of Texts.AC]. To find
    ...
    Authors in the DOE ListAC. (For works of Texts. Ælfric, there is a very convenient tabulation of NRK and AC numbers in Aaron Kleist, “Ælfric’s Corpus: A Conspectus,” //Florilegium// 18.2 (2001): 113-64.
    If there is an A-S version, then get the standard edition, which should be listed in the List of Texts, but keep in mind that the edition cited by DOE may have been superseded. Check relevant secondary lit for the information you’ll need to discuss in the body of the entry (such as date and authorship, how much of the text is translated, which parts, etc.).
    For secondary lit. on the A-S versions and on the other categories of the headnote, consult GR, supplemented by the annual bibliographies in ASE and the Old English Newsletter Bibliography Database http://www.oenewsletter.org/OENDB/index.php. Also check the indexes to Phillip Pulsiano, A Bibliography of North American Dissertations on Old English and Luke Reinsma, Aelfric: An Annotated Bibliography (New York, 1987).
    Quots/Cits4-5. Quots/Cits and Refs
    (These two categories can be dealt with together.)
    Start with Lapidge, The Anglo-Saxon Library and locate all references to the author and work(s). Note that while Lapidge comprehensively compiles data from the apparatus fontium from printed editions, in most cases he will not have attempted to assess each source claim independently. That should be done for SASLC entries because many “fontes” claimed by editors or critics may be dubious. An effort should be made to compare the Anglo-Saxon text against the claimed sources to determine whether there are in fact clear verbal citations or at least compelling verbal echoes, or if not, then parallels of idea that are distinctive enough to make it reasonably likely that they derived from that particular source. These decisions will often be subjective, but it is the responsibility of entry writers to make them. Phantom fontes should be eliminated, but with reference in the Body to the excluded claims (often it will suffice simply to say that Lapidge records some additional sources that have been excluded). Slight or dubious fontes should be listed with a question mark and the notation “see below,” with a brief explanation in the Body as to why they are slight or dubious. Often it will suffice simply to state that the parallel in question is slight or dubious because there are no verbal echoes, or that the idea in question was too commonplace to pin down to that particular source; but in some cases it may be necessary to specify in more detail why you disagree with the published claim.
    Follow up by checking editions of Anglo-Latin and OE texts, and of secondary scholarship on them, focusing on work published after about 2000 (The Anglo-Saxon Library was published in 2005). Also Google (including Google Books and Google Scholar) the name of your author and title of your text together with the search words “Anglo-Saxon” / “Anglo-Latin” / “Old English.” Search multiple ways that scholars might cite your author or text, e.g. whether in its Latin form(s), trying spellings with boh u/i and v/j; or in Anglicized form, or in English translation; or in the possessive case (“Ambrose’s” will turn up hits that “Ambrose” misses); or in other major research languages (Hieronymus, Jerome, Girolamo; Gregorius, Gregor, Grégoire; etc.). You can delimit the search to exclude hits before about 2000, but first try it without a chronological limit, especially if your author or text is rare.
    ...
    from Lapidge’s List of Abbreviations.Abbreviations for Sources. Use “Source
    ...
    employing the List of TextsAC abbreviations for
    ...
    “Guide to Readers” under the heading “Standard Editions.”Readers.”
    Body of the entry
    ...
    in ASM.
    For bibliography on your Latin work, in addition to CPL and the other reference works listed above, consult especially Medioevo Latino: Bollettino bibliografico della cultura europea dal secolo VI al XIII (Spoleto, 1979– ), preferably via the online Mirabile database. Note that in the print volumes, bibliography on the influence of pre-medieval authors in the Middle Ages is gathered under the heading “Fortleben.” As a rule, you should only cite bibliography that’s immediately relevant to whatever problems you need to discuss in the body of the entry. It is not SASLC’s purpose to compile complete bibliographies on every Latin author or work. Completeness is desired only for secondary literature directly pertaining to knowledge of the work in Anglo-Saxon England.
    The remainder of the body of the entry is devoted to brief discussion and explanation of the information summarized in the other categories of the headnote, noting for example in the case of a quot/cit what idea, theme, or motif is taken from the Latin work. If it’s uncertain whether the Anglo-Saxon author knew the work first–hand or through an intermediate source, or if a quot/cit or ref is doubtful, this should be explained here. The entry may conclude with any relevant comments or suggestions about work in progress or desiderata.
    Bibliography
    ...
    used in SASLC Volume 1 (2001).Brown and Biggs, Bede, vol. 1.
    Thomas N.
    ...
    Charles D. Wright
    2014 (rev. June 2018)
    Wright, 2014
    Revised by the Editoral Board 2017

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